Odd-Even switch. We compare the Odd-Even switch to the ordinary input-buffered switch and we find that it can achieve a remarkably higher performance, in terms of throughput, mean delay and cell loss. This is due to the fact that the Head-of-Line effect becomes less problematic under the Odd-Even switch. Our results are based on various traffic models. Finally, we compare the Odd-Even scheme to the Look-ahead (input "window") policy." />


The Odd-Even ATM Switch

Christos KOLIAS  Leonard KLEINROCK  

Publication
IEICE TRANSACTIONS on Communications   Vol.E81-B   No.2   pp.244-250
Publication Date: 1998/02/25
Online ISSN: 
DOI: 
Print ISSN: 0916-8516
Type of Manuscript: Special Section PAPER (Special Issue on ATM Switching Systems for future B-ISDN)
Category: ATM switching architecture
Keyword: 
odd-even,  ATM switching,  input-queueing,  head-of-line blocking,  

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Summary: 
This paper introduces and studies the performance of an NN space-division, single-stage ATM switch with dual input-queueing. Each input port has two separate FIFO queues, an "odd" and an "even" queue. An incoming cell is stored at the input at either of two FIFOs according its output port destination (output ports are also labeled as "odd" or "even"). Hence we call this scheme the Odd-Even switch. We compare the Odd-Even switch to the ordinary input-buffered switch and we find that it can achieve a remarkably higher performance, in terms of throughput, mean delay and cell loss. This is due to the fact that the Head-of-Line effect becomes less problematic under the Odd-Even switch. Our results are based on various traffic models. Finally, we compare the Odd-Even scheme to the Look-ahead (input "window") policy.