Improvement of Pressure Control Skill with Knife Device for Paper-Cutting

Takafumi HIGASHI  Hideaki KANAI  

Publication
IEICE TRANSACTIONS on Information and Systems   Vol.E103-D   No.8   pp.1856-1864
Publication Date: 2020/08/01
Online ISSN: 1745-1361
DOI: 10.1587/transinf.2019EDP7237
Type of Manuscript: PAPER
Category: Human-computer Interaction
Keyword: 
cutting,  knife interface,  stylus,  drawing display,  supporting practice,  

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Summary: 
In this paper, we propose an interactive system for controlling the pressure while cutting paper with a knife. The purpose is to improve the cutting skill of novices learning the art of paper-cutting. Our system supports skill improvement for novices by measuring and evaluating their cutting pressure in real-time. In this study, we use a knife with a blade attached to a stylus with a pressure sensor, which can measure the pressure, coordinates, and cutting time. We have developed a similar support system using a stylus and a tablet device. This system allows the user to experience the pressure of experts through tracing. Paper-cutting is created by cutting paper with a knife. The practice system in this paper provides practice in an environment more akin to the production of paper cutting. In the first experiment, we observed differences in cutting ability by comparing cutting pressures between novices and experts. As a result, we confirmed that novices cut paper at a higher pressure than experts. We developed a practice system that guides the novices on controlling the pressure by providing information on the cutting pressure values of experts. This system shows the difference in pressure between novices and experts using a synchronous display of color and sound. Using these functions, novices learn to adjust their cutting pressure according to that of experts. Determining the right cutting pressure is a critical skill in the art of paper-cutting, and we aim to improve the same with our system. In the second experiment, we tested the effect of the practice system on the knife device. We compared the changes in cutting pressure with and without our system, the practice methods used in the workshop, and the previously developed stylus-based support system. As a result, we confirmed that practicing with the knife device had a better effect on the novice's skill in controlling cutting pressure than other practice methods.